Health

Eat these healthy murabbas and how to make them

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The winter season is here, and that means you can enjoy murabbas to your heart’s content. Read on to know the kind of varieties you can nosh on!

The crisp air and plummeting temperatures have announced the arrival of the winter season. But this season is also about soaking in the afternoon sun, and noshing on seasonal foods. The freshness of fruits and veggies available during this time of the year is unparalleled. As they say, when life gives you seasonal winter produce, you make murabbas out of them (no kidding!). 

So before we tell you about some winter-friendly murabbas, let’s first know a little more about what they are! It is a method of preserving fruits and veggies — in fact, spices and edible oils are added to bring out their piquant taste. 

murabbas
Eat adequate quantities of fruits and veggies. Image courtesy: Shutterstock

It’s time to tell you about some of the most healthy murabbas for winter, and why they are good for you. To gain more insight on this, we got in touch with Avni Kaul, Nutritionist, Dietician and Wellness Coach, and Founder of Nutri Activania. 

The magic of murabbas

Don’t miss out on these varieties: 

1. Amla murabba: “This variety is the best for your health. Amla is a rich source of vitamin C and iron. Interestingly, they are beneficial both during‌‌ the summer and winter season, which makes it more refreshing,” Kaul shares with HealthShots

Amla or Indian gooseberry facilitates better immersion of nutrients from your food, aids digestion and assimilates the food you have eaten. It also immaculately calms mild to moderate hyperacidity, and other digestive troubles. 

“It also helps to strengthen the liver and eradicates poisons from the body. Amla is also helpful for the brain and nervous system. It has excellent antiviral, antibacterial, and antifungal properties, and keeps your immune system in check,” she adds, sharing that amla also helps in getting glowing skin and shiny tresses. 

2. Apple murabba: Consuming this murabba every single day during the winter season will prove to be helpful, says Kaul. “It provides vitality to your skin, helps reduce wrinkles and blemishes, is a good antioxidant which fights off free radicals in the body and precludes skin ageing. Apple murabba can also stimulate collagen production and maintain skin health,” she adds.

murabbas
Apples are packed with health benefits! Image courtesy: Shutterstock

3. Bel murabba: It may reduce abdominal diseases, strengthen the digestive system and regulate bowel movement. Bel murabba is a rich source of carbohydrates, fats, protein, vitamin C and minerals like iron, phosphorus, carotene and thiamin. The fruit strengthens liver function too.

4. Ginger murabba: “It helps in the treatment of loss of appetite, nausea, vomiting, dyspepsia and indigestion. This murabba is also beneficial to tackle abdominal heaviness after a meal, abdominal distention, abdominal pain, arthritis, joint disorders, common cold, flu, diarrhoea and menstrual problems,” shares Kaul.

5. Pineapple murabba: Pineapple is a rich source of potassium and vitamins. It is also rich in both soluble and insoluble fibres. So, how about adding it to your winter diet?

murabbas
Nosh on pineapples as a fruit or reap the benefits of its juice. Image courtesy: Shutterstock
Here’s how you can incorporate murabba to your diet, says Kaul

1. Instead of taking a full piece, take only half.

2. In place of sugar, use jaggery to make the syrup.

3. Wash the murabba to remove the excess syrup.

So ladies, how about making murabba your bae this winter!

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